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Connecting the Dots

Population matters to everyone. Understanding our population challenges and their impact will help in planning for the future, so that Singapore can be a good home for Singaporeans from all walks of life.

Get an overview

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The issue

As with many developed countries, Singapore’s citizen population is ageing rapidly. However, as a small city-state, the impact of ageing may be even more far-reaching: from changes within our families, to broader impacts on our society, economy and future. And the solution is far from clear-cut. It requires balancing among different and sometimes competing needs, including infrastructure plans, jobs and economic growth, and the overall makeup of society.

What Being Done

What we need

  1. Ensuring a cohesive and well-integrated society with room for diversity.
  2. Keeping our economy open and competitive, with a strong local workforce.
  3. Building a supportive environment where it is a good place to raise strong families and grow old in, and there are opportunities for all ages.

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What's being done

  • Planning ahead to prepare for demographic shifts and changing population needs.
  • Tighter coordination across agencies, led by the National Population and Talent Division, to tackle inter-related issues.
  • Changing gears to a productivity-driven economy, through tightened manpower policies and restructuring efforts.
  • Investing the fruits of economic growth for social purposes, to support Singaporeans from all walks of life.
  • Partnering the community to bring people together, and strengthen our society.

Perspectives Get the population angle on jobs and economy in Singapore

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Man standing ahead of two ways

Articles

Is Singapore facing a population time bomb?

On the surface, Singapore’s ageing population may seem like an insurmountable challenge/problem. But with the right strategies and a shift in mindsets, there is no reason why we cannot turn challenge into opportunity.

Singapore skyline in the evening

Pop Explains

Why is economic growth slowing in Singapore?

Singapore’s economic growth has slowed from an average of 7% a decade ago to about 3% today. What are the reasons for Singapore’s slowing growth and should we be worried?

Asian baby smiling into the camera

Around the web

China's baby bonanza

One year on from when China relaxed its one-child policy to a universal two-child policy, there are encouraging signs that Chinese people are shifting back to the norm of having two children.

grandparents w grandchild_Depositphotos_64583715_original_resized

Articles

Singapore's population challenge in a nutshell

Singapore’s population challenge is the result of two intertwined trends – people living longer, and low fertility. Find out what this challenge really means for Singapore’s future.

Kids putting their legs in the air

  • Why is economic growth slowing in Singapore?

    Singapore’s economic growth has slowed from an average of 7% a decade ago to about 3% today. What are the reasons for Singapore’s slowing growth and should we be worried?

  • Do we need a population projection?

    Most of us have heard of the (in)famous population projection of 6.9M by 2030, but what is this number used for, and what does it say about our future

Around The Web

aroundtheweb

China's baby bonanza

One year on from when China relaxed its one-child policy to a universal two-child policy, there are encouraging signs that Chinese people are shifting back to the norm of having two children.

aroundtheweb
aroundtheweb

Bucking the trend - More babies in more developed countries

It used to be that low birthrates were the destiny of development. With better child survival rates and more career opportunities, people in developed countries were having fewer babies compared to their developing country counterparts.

aroundtheweb

Paying the price of closing Singapore’s gates

ST Editor, Warren Fernandez: “So long as we plan and provide the necessary housing, transport, health care and other facilities for these workers […] Singapore has no reason to shut its gates”